Eco-Physiologist Alexander Gerson Receives $756,000 NSF Grant to Study How Birds Burn Stored Fat

Migrating birds complete long non-stop flights of many hours for songbirds and days for some shorebirds to reach breeding or wintering grounds. During such flights a bird's metabolic rate is very high, fueled by stored fat, but also by burning the protein in muscles and organs in a process that is not well understood, says eco-physiologist Alexander Gerson at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Now he has received a three-year, $756,000 National Science Foundation grant to thoroughly investigate the consequences and mechanisms of this phenomenon, which sometimes leads to dramatic reductions in migrating birds' muscle mass and organs but may not result in significant loss of function.

His research team will also look at water-loss rates in non-flight conditions, at rest, and look for differences among migrants and non-migrants. Further, Gerson and colleagues will conduct metabolic phenotyping and use transcriptomics to explore molecular mechanisms of protein breakdown and regeneration with UMass Amherst molecular biologists Courtney Babbitt and Larry Schwartz.

Read more in EurekAlert! article

Bartlett Receives $837,000 NSF Grant For Her Research in Unlocking the Genetic Secrets of Flower Diversity


A biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is hoping to unlock the genetic secrets of flowering plants — information that could be used to grow better crops. The researcher, Madelaine Bartlett, will study the development and evolution of grass flowers such as corn and wheat.

Bartlett said the goal of the project is to understand how the genetics of grass flowers influence their growth. “As the climate changes, we can develop more and better crops that can survive in places they wouldn’t have been able to survive before,” she said.

Read more in the Boston Globe article

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Postdoctoral Research Associate


POSTDOCTORAL POSITION IN BEE HEALTH AND ECOLOGY, University of Massachusetts Amherst 

The Adler Lab at the University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass, Amherst) seeks a Postdoctoral Research Associate to assess how sunflower pollen and plantings affect bumble and honey bee health under the guidance and supervision of the Principle Investigator. The appointee is expected to establish some independence in research design and execution, and to publish her/his work as appropriate in collaboration with the principle investigator.

This is a benefited, full-time Postdoctoral Research Associate position. Initial appointment is for one year; reappointment beyond the first year is contingent upon availability of funding and job performance. Funding is available for two years. Primary responsibilities will include, but are not limited to, deploying bumble bee colonies in field and farm settings with different diet treatments and measuring colony performance; measuring foraging behavior using RFID tagging; coordinating with farmers to conduct on-farm research; coordinating with the Bee Informed Partnership (BIP) to conduct honey bee dose trials at commercial apiaries; and training lab personnel in various experimental techniques.

The successful candidate is required to have a Ph.D. in biology, entomology, ecology or related field by the time of hire. Highly desirable qualifications include experience working with bumble or honey bees in field and/or lab settings, demonstrated record of publishing research in quality journals, experience communicating or working with beekeepers and/or farmers, expertise in R and statistical analysis, experience and/or strong interest in plant-insect interactions and applied ecology, and experience or interest in mentoring undergraduates. Inquiries about the position can be directed to Lynn Adler, lsadler@bio.umass.edu.

Postdoctoral Research Associates at the University of Massachusetts are unionized and receive standard salary and benefits, depending on experience. Salary is subject to bargaining unit contract, with a salary minima of $47,476.

Candidates must apply online by submitting a cover letter, CV, summary of research interests, and the contact details of three references willing to provide letters of recommendation to:

http://umass.interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=88401

Review of applications will begin September 22, 2017 and continue until the position is filled. Applications received by September 22, 2017 will be given priority consideration.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities and encourages applications from these and other protected group members. 

Professor Adler Receives a $1 Million Grant to Study Sunflower Pollen

Biology professor Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, an expert in pollination and plant-insect interactions, recently received a three-year, $1 million grant from a special “pollinator health” program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to study the role that sunflower pollen may play in improving bee health.

In addition to basic research, the grant emphasizes extension outreach to the public and stakeholders such as amateur beekeepers, commercial bumblebee producers, vegetable and fruit growers, commercial seed producers and others to make the most useful results and new knowledge available to them.

Read more UMass News & Media Relations article

Digital Life Project Uses 3D Technology to Document Endangered Frogs for Future Generations

The Digital Life team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by evolutionary biologist Duncan Irschick today unveiled an online set of 15 three-dimensional (3D) models of live frogs, including several endangered species, to promote conservation, education and science by showcasing their extraordinary beauty and vulnerability to ecological threats.

“Frogs of the World” represents the first-ever use of 3D technology to preserve accurate, high-resolution models of some of the most endangered frog species on the planet, say Irschick and members of the interdisciplinary Digital Life team.

Photo credit Daily Hampshire Gazette

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