Babbitt receives NSF grant for research on how human and chimp brains evolved

Courtney Babbitt, Biology, has received a three-year, $330,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to use new state-of-the-art computational, evolutionary and experimental methods to examine how natural selection has shaped gene expression in the human brain. Babbitt and colleagues will test the hypothesis that there are functional links between adaptation in the genome and changes in neural types that occurred during human evolution.
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https://www.umass.edu/newsoffice/article/umass-amherst-genomics-research...

Assistant/Associate Professor (TT) in: Translational Neuroscience: Animal Models of Neurological Disease

The Department of Biology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor. The successful candidate will also be a part of the Institute for Applied Life Sciences (see IALS), which has the goals of developing translational research programs, fostering interactions with industry, and training a translational life sciences workforce. New faculty members will be able to take full advantage of the substantial investments in campus infrastructure and core facilities made by IALS (see IALS Cores for details).

Assistant Professor in Cell Biology (TT)

The Department of Biology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst invites applications from quantitative cell biologists for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor. We are broadly seeking cell biologists who are addressing fundamental questions using quantitative microscopy, molecular, biochemical, and/or genetic approaches. This search is part of a strategic investment in quantitative life sciences, and we especially encourage applicants whose research uses quantitative methods including, but not limited to, mathematical modeling of cell and/or sub-cellular behaviors, automated image analysis, and/or single molecule imaging. The cell biologist will be able to take full advantage of substantial new investments in campus infrastructure, including the light microscopy core facility, which was recently designated a Nikon Center of Excellence, and will join a department with existing strength in the cytoskeleton cell biology field. The successful candidate will be expected to have a strong commitment to undergraduate and graduate education. For more information visit: www.bio.umass.edu/biology/about/announcements

Biology student Bryanna Joyce conducted research with honeybees as a summer scholar!

If you are fond of fruits, vegetables, and nuts, you will appreciate the research Bryanna Joyce ’20 conducted with honeybees as a summer scholar at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Joyce, a plant and soil sciences major, spent five weeks feeding bees in 55 different hives at a commercial apiary in Barre, Massachusetts, in an experiment to learn if natural pollens can improve the health of honeybees. Each week she hand made dozens of pollen patties—out of sunflower pollen, wildflower pollen, a mixture of both, or a pollen substitute beekeepers often employ. She then measured the prevalence of several parasites and diseases harmful to the bees.

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