Bartlett Receives $837,000 NSF Grant For Her Research in Unlocking the Genetic Secrets of Flower Diversity


A biologist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst is hoping to unlock the genetic secrets of flowering plants — information that could be used to grow better crops. The researcher, Madelaine Bartlett, will study the development and evolution of grass flowers such as corn and wheat.

Bartlett said the goal of the project is to understand how the genetics of grass flowers influence their growth. “As the climate changes, we can develop more and better crops that can survive in places they wouldn’t have been able to survive before,” she said.

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Professor Adler Receives a $1 Million Grant to Study Sunflower Pollen

Biology professor Lynn Adler at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, an expert in pollination and plant-insect interactions, recently received a three-year, $1 million grant from a special “pollinator health” program of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to study the role that sunflower pollen may play in improving bee health.

In addition to basic research, the grant emphasizes extension outreach to the public and stakeholders such as amateur beekeepers, commercial bumblebee producers, vegetable and fruit growers, commercial seed producers and others to make the most useful results and new knowledge available to them.

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Digital Life Project Uses 3D Technology to Document Endangered Frogs for Future Generations

The Digital Life team at the University of Massachusetts Amherst led by evolutionary biologist Duncan Irschick today unveiled an online set of 15 three-dimensional (3D) models of live frogs, including several endangered species, to promote conservation, education and science by showcasing their extraordinary beauty and vulnerability to ecological threats.

“Frogs of the World” represents the first-ever use of 3D technology to preserve accurate, high-resolution models of some of the most endangered frog species on the planet, say Irschick and members of the interdisciplinary Digital Life team.

Photo credit Daily Hampshire Gazette

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Li Awarded $1.6 Million NIH Grant to Study Inner Ear Signal Processing

Geng-Lin Li, biology, recently was awarded a five-year, $1.6 million grant by the National Institutes of Health to study auditory signal processing in the inner ear. His findings will expand basic understanding of hearing and could lead to better hearing protection.

He says, “Our inner ear can process sensory signals with remarkable precision, but it comes with the cost of vulnerability, making it very easily damaged by noise and by aging. As we advance our basic understanding of hearing and satisfy our curiosity, new approaches could arise, allowing us to design better protection for people who work in a noisy environment.”

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Bezanilla appears in three iBiology videos

Magdalena Bezanilla appears in three iBiology videos . iBiology's mission is to convey, in the form of open-access free videos, the excitement of modern biology and the process by which scientific discoveries are made. iBiology aims to let you meet the leading scientists in biology, so that you can find out how they think about scientific questions and conduct their research, and can get a sense of their personalities, opinions, and perspectives. Bezanilla’s videos describe the research in her lab. The first video is a more general introduction to one of the major research topics in her lab: (video 1) polarized plant cell growth and the role of the cytoskeleton. The second and third videos dig deeper into two major findings: (video 2) using reverse genetics to functionally dissect an entire gene family, and (video 3) how plant cell division is steered.