Irschick, Crosby, and Gilman Reported That Geckos Have a Spring-like Mechanism in Their Bodies to Enhance Adhesion

Duncan J. Irschick, Biology, Alfred J. Crosby, Polymer Science and Engineering, and doctoral candidate Casey A. Gilman, Biology, have shown that geckos have a spring-like mechanism in their bodies to enhance adhesion as they become larger, as reported in PLOS ONE article. In 2012, four of the authors invented the flexible adhesive Geckskin. BBC article, Science Newsline article. Nature World News article., UMass News & Media Relations article.

Gerald Downes, Biology, with James Chambers and Josef Trapani, Awarded $824,000 NSF Grant to Study How Neurons Regulate Location

Gerald Downes, Biology, with James Chambers, Chemistry, and Amherst College neurobiologist Josef Trapani, have been awarded a three-year $824,025 collaborative research grant from the National Science Foundation to study the zebrafish brain to better understand how neurons regulate locomotion. Downes, the lead investigator, says his ultimate research goal is to better understand how different chemical signals, called neurotransmitters, work together at cellular and molecular levels to coordinate normal locomotion such as walking and swimming.

News-medical.net.

Phys.org.

UMass News & Media Relations.

Hazen and Harrington Receive Two Grants to Develop Crop Biotechnology Venture

Plant growth is in part determined by a network of genes that influence total biomass yield. By studying the regulatory mechanisms of how plants build themselves, the Hazen Laboratory has identified ways to potentially boost energy crop yield. Professor Samuel Hazen and Postdoctoral Fellow Michael J. Harrington have been awarded grants from the National Science Foundation and the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center (MassCEC). The NSF Innovation Corp program award of $50,000 is designed to extend the basic laboratory research to entrepreneurial ventures. By participating in this program they will explore product opportunities and a business development plan. The MassCEC provided a $40,000 catalyst award to test what they have learned in their laboratory model, the small grass Brachypodium distachyon, in energy crop species.

Sandra Roy Receives Fellowship

Sandra Roy, Ph.D. candidate in animal biotechnology and biomedical sciences, has been a research fellow and lab manager in Margaret Riley’s laboratory since 2009, where she has studied bacteriocins, toxins that bacteria produce to attack other closely related bacteria, particularly those that are active against Gram negative strains. Riley, Roy and colleagues formed the company Bacteriotix in 2010 to investigate the use of bacteriocins as new drug candidates for treating these infections. The fellowship will allow Roy to expand her basic laboratory research on catheter-acquired urinary tract infection (CAUTI) interventions to include proof-of-concept studies on the most promising drug candidates. This will include purifying bacteriocins to the level required for a manufacturer to use them in a test batch for FDA-required safety and efficacy studies.Roy, Riley and colleagues have engaged Pheromonicin Biotech USA, Inc. to commercialize this product and the fellowship should accelerate the process.

Read the News & Media Relations article here.

Finals Week Rejuvenation Station

Biology students are invited to stop by the Finals Week Rejuvenation Station for refreshments: Morrill III South Room 215. Friday April 29th thru Wednesday May 4th
7:00 A.M. - 4:30 P.M.