Biologists Develop BeastCam for Shark Research

When biologist Duncan J. Irschick worked with sharks in Florida last spring, he longed for a simple, quick tool for creating 3-dimensional models of them, as well as the geckos he studies. So, he and colleagues developed a multi-armed platform that integrates several cameras plus a computer system to produce 3-D images. They call it the “Beastcam.”

Click here for video

JIPB WORKSHOP ON SCIENTIFIC WRITING LED BY TOBIAS BASKIN

Tobias Baskin led the eighth Workshop on Scientific Writing sponsored by the Journal of Integrative Plant Biology, and held this year on Dec. 8-9, 2015 at the Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences in Guangzhou, China.

Scientific papers, which act as the central means of communication for researchers in connection with their community, are essential for the progress of scientific development. Indeed, the value of clear and effective communication within the scientific community through the dialogue of scientific journals has never been more apparent as local Chinese research and publications are increasingly cited on an international scale. However, in considering research aimed at international journals, reviewers are also becoming more and more concerned with not only the high quality of the submission's scientific content, but also the quality of its writing. As the competition increases, to secure publication in a high-ranking journal only the most succinct, language-sufficient, and logically crafted articles will suffice.

To match the demand, the Journal of Integrative Plant Biology (JIPB) and Agro-biological Gene Research Center of Guangdong Academy of Agricultural Sciences (GDAAS) jointly held a workshop on scientific writing as a part of a series of workshops held by JIPB. Baskin outlined the guidelines for scientific writing and helped the audience to gain insight into the lengthy process of scientific paper writing, and help teach students how to plan and prepare accordingly.

The workshop was attended by more than 100 young scientists, from all over China.

ORETT BURKE, JR, BIOLOGY STUDENT FEATURED IN UMASS PROFILE SERIES

A talented basketball player at his former college, Orett transferred to study biological sciences in hope of one day becoming a doctor.
Even if you're not a science major, there's so many things out here for you. There's probably one class that would change your mind, just like me in high school. I'm not sure how many schools in America where you're able to do research on what you want to do and be with someone you want to be inspired to be in 10 years. And I think that's one of the greatest advantages about UMass. My name is Orett Burke Jr, class of 2017. I stand for dream-chasing and I stand for UMass.

Click here for video

Thank you!


THANK YOU if you have joined us for Giving Tuesday and dedicated your gift. Every contribution is appreciated. To be part of Giving Tuesday and support your college, visit Give2CNS. Someone in your life will thank you, too!

Society of Vertebrate Paleontology Honors Margery Coombs

At the Society of Vertebrate Paleontology’s (SVP) 75th annual meeting in October in Dallas, professor emeritus Margery Coombs, biology, was awarded honorary membership, one of the three major academic career awards given by the society, to recognize her long career of “distinguished contribution to vertebrate paleontology.” The society is the premier international body for the interdisciplinary field of vertebrate paleontology.

Coombs is internationally known for her research on fossil perissodactyls, that is, odd-toed ungulates such as rhinos, tapirs and horses, and in particular on chalicotheres, a group with claws rather than hooves that roamed the Earth from about 55 million years ago until they became extinct about 1 million years ago.

Read more UMass News & Media Relations article.