Current News

AgBioCin is a new company created by students in the Riley Laboratory with the mission of revolutionizing the prevention and treatment of infectious disease in agriculture.

In 2009 Hult International Business School MBA student Ahmad Ashkar founded a company to give his then peers around the world a platform to have sustainable, profitable impact. He later convinced Hult’s President, Dr. Stephen Hodges to begin hosting startup events on each of Hult’s five global campuses around the world with a focus on the creation of a new kind of business which was dubbed, “the impact enterprise.” One year, and one meeting with Bertil Hult later, the Hult Prize Foundation was born. Today, the Hult Prize is one of the world’s most acclaimed entrepreneurship programs operating on more than 1500 university campuses in 121 countries and has become a benchmark startup challenge for social entrepreneurship.

Peg Riley was invited to give a "Fireside Chat" with Keith Yamamoto at the Precision Medicine Conference in Silicon Valley in January.

Keith R. Yamamoto is Vice Chancellor for Research, Executive Vice Dean of the School of Medicine, and Professor of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology at the University of California, San Francisco, UCSF.

The Precision Medicine World Conference is the largest & original annual conference dedicated to precision medicine. PMWC’s mission is to bring together recognized leaders, top global researchers and medical professionals, and innovators across healthcare and biotechnology sectors to showcase practical content that helps close the knowledge gap between different sectors, thereby catalyzing cross-functional fertilization & collaboration in an effort to accelerate the development and spread of precision medicine.

Biology assistant professor Alexander Gerson and his postdoctoral research associate Derrick Groom, with others, compared the short-term effects of resting vs. long duration flight on the rate of lean body mass loss in birds.

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If you are fond of fruits, vegetables, and nuts, you will appreciate the research Bryanna Joyce ’20 conducted with honeybees as a summer scholar at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Joyce, a plant and soil sciences major, spent five weeks feeding bees in 55 different hives at a commercial apiary in Barre, Massachusetts, in an experiment to learn if natural pollens can improve the health of honeybees. Each week she hand made dozens of pollen patties—out of sunflower pollen, wildflower pollen, a mixture of both, or a pollen substitute beekeepers often employ. She then measured the prevalence of several parasites and diseases harmful to the bees.

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A New, Social Science-based Approach to Improve Weed Management . Click here to see full article.

Biology professors Elsbeth Walker and Madelaine Bartlett provided expert commentary for a news story about gene editing in human embryos.