The Graduate Program in

About OEB

The Graduate Program in Organismic and Evolutionary Biology provides interdepartmental training for MS and PhD students in ecology, organismal and evolutionary biology. Graduate students, post-docs, and faculty study biological processes ranging from the molecular to the ecosystem level, often bridging the gap between basic and applied research. Our faculty and students conduct research in four broad areas:

Animal Behavior: Behavioral ecology, communication, learning
Ecology: Community ecology, population ecology, landscape ecology, conservation biology
Evolutionary Biology: Evolution, phylogenetics, population genetics, molecular evolution
Organismal Biology: Physiology, morphology, paleontology

News

Spring 2015 Science Café

OEB Science Cafe's are back with our Spring Series! Science Cafe's have moved to Amherst Brewing Company and are now on Tuesday nights. The events are free, open to the public, and start at 6 p.m.

February 3
Neighborhood watch: Social eavesdropping in birds, with Sarah Goodwin

March 3
Deja vu: Repeated forms in evolution, with Dr. Daniel Moen

April 7
Developing diversity: The role of nature and nurture in evolution, with Dr. Kara Powder

May 5
Nature knows best: Biologically inspired technology, with Drs. Duncan Irschick and Al Crosby

Schneider's work on ant's farming armored scale insects featured in BBC Earth

Melissotarsus weissi

Scott Schneider, joint OEB/Entomology PhD Candidate, studies the interactions between the Afrotropical ant genus Melissotarsus and the armoured scale insects from the family Diaspididae. His work on ant farmers is featured in Amazing animal farmers that grow their own food. For more information, check out Casey Gilman's story on Schneider's interesting discovery.

Search for Darwin Fellow underway

Our current Darwin Postdoctoral Fellow, Dan Moen, has accepted a position at Oklahoma State University and will be leaving at the end of his first year. A search for a new Darwin Fellow is now underway. Details can be found HERE. Applications are due by January 26, 2015.

Alcott's research featured in local papers

Herring & snapping turtle

Derrick Alcott, first year OEB doctoral student, is already garnering press for his work on Cape Cod river herring. Alcott studies alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) and is particularly interested in how the various impediments in the Herring River valley affect the herring’s ability to migrate. His work was recently featured in several Cape publications, including Wicked Local Wellfleet.

Stengle's work featured on Jeff Corwin's 'Ocean Mysteries'

Timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus)

OEB PhD candidate Anne Stengle's timber rattlesnake research was recently featured on Jeff Corwin's 'Ocean Mysteries'. Stengle studies habitat selection, connectivity, and viability of the endangered timber rattlesnake (Crotalus horridus) metapopulation in southwestern Massachusetts. Watch as Stengle and Corwin visit one of Stengle's field sites.