Biology Intensive Orientation Session (BIOS)

The Biology Intensive Orientation Session (BIOS) is a rigorous academic program designed to enhance the success of first-year students in life science majors. BIOS immerses incoming students in college-level biology coursework, and encourages interactions among academically like-minded students in the week just before the Fall semester. The BIOS experience includes lectures, discussions, writing and test experiences and engagement in a group project for presentation. Students are also embedded in campus life and become familiar with dorm living, dining halls, the layout of campus. Most importantly students meet each other, work together on challenging projects, and have a chance to develop friendships and study groups that can last for their entire college career and beyond. For more information about BIOS, please contact Susan Clevenger (suec@bio.umass.edu, 413-545-2287).

Dr. POWDER JOINING CLEMSON UNIVERSITY



Dr. Kara E. Powder, a postdoc in the lab of Dr. Craig Albertson, will be joining the Clemson University Department of Biological Sciences in Fall 2016 as an Assistant Professor.  There she will continue her work on the genomic and developmental basis of craniofacial evolution in cichlid fishes.  Congratulations, Kara!




CONGRATULATIONS TO KATELYN MULLEN ‘16


Katelyn Mullen, a senior Biology major, is the recipient of a Biology Undergraduate Travel Award. She will be presenting her research in a poster titled “New single-copy nuclear loci for scale insect’s systematics” at the International Symposium of Scale Insect Studies in Catania, Sicily this June. Katelyn works in the laboratory of Professor Ben Normark; he and Scott Schneider are coauthors on the abstract. She looks forward to presenting her research in this professional meeting and discussing her work with experts in her field. Congratulations, Katelyn!




BIOLOGY PROFESSOR BEN NORMARK SELECTED AS A FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR

Benjamin Normark, biology, was recently selected as a Fulbright scholar and will spend the fall 2016 semester in Mexico documenting the spread of the insect, cycad aulacaspis scale. It is an invasive species that threatens the country’s cycads, plants sometimes called “living fossils” because they have changed little in the last 280 million years.

Globally, says Normark, “Cycads are under unprecedented assault from armored scale insects and from the global nursery trade that sees cycads as commercially valuable ornamentals.” The plants superficially resemble palms, and are sometimes called ‘sago palms,’ but they constitute their own ancient branch of the plant family tree.

Read more UMass News & Media Relations article

Position Available: Postdoctoral Research Associate

A postdoctoral fellowship in comparative endocrinology is available at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst beginning April 1, 2016. The fellowship is supported by an NSF grant with funding for 4 years and will examine the hormonal control of osmoregulation in lamprey.

Click here for position details. Questions? Contact Dr. Stephen McCormick.