Postdoctoral Research Associate

POST-DOCTORAL POSITION in Evolutionary Morphology, University of Massachusetts at Amherst 

The Dumont Lab at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (UMass Amherst) seeks a Postdoctoral Research Associate to work collaboratively on projects that focus on the form, function and evolution of the skulls and jaw of vertebrates. This is a fully benefited, full-time Postdoctoral Research Associate position. Initial appointment for one year; reappointment beyond first year is contingent upon availability of funding and job performance. Salary is subject to bargaining unit contract. The postdoctoral associate’s primary responsibilities will be to contribute to a Collaborative NSF Dimensions of Biodiversity grant that focuses the evolution of sensory systems in bats (http://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1442278&HistoricalAwards...), by collecting and analyzing data and contributing to co-authored manuscripts for peer-reviewed publication and to mentor undergraduate and graduate students. Independent projects related the lab’s mission and participation in mentored undergraduate teaching experiences are encouraged. For more information on the Dumont Lab visit http://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/dumont and www.biomesh.org.

Minimum requirements include a completed PhD in a related field (e.g., evolutionary biology, zoology, paleontology).  Ability to make regular day trips to Cambridge, MA to use ct-scanning facilities.

Preferred requirements include training in some combination of comparative anatomy, comparative methods, geometric morphometrics staining specimens for ct-scanning, 3D visualization of ct-scans, manipulation of 3D images, and mentoring or teaching experience.
Postdoctoral Research Associates at the University of Massachusetts are unionized and receive standard salary and benefits, depending on experience.

Please apply online by submitting a cover letter, CV, summary of research interests, summary of mentoring/teaching experiences, and the contact details of three references to:

http://umass.interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=73899

For information email: bdumont@bio.umass.edu. 

Review of applications will begin July 25th, 2016. Applications received by July 25th will be given priority consideration.

The University of Massachusetts Amherst is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities and encourages applications from these and other protected group members. 

Research Fellow Position

RESEARCH FELLOW, University of Massachusetts Amherst 
The Albertson Lab at the University of Massachusetts Amherst (UMass, Amherst) seeks a Research Fellow to generate and maintain lines of fish, and perform basic molecular biological research focused on the development and evolution of the skeletal system under the guidance and supervision of the Principle Investigator (Dr. Craig Albertson) and co-PI (Dr. Rolf Karlstrom).

This is a non-benefited, full-time position. Initial appointment is for one year; reappointment beyond the first year is contingent upon availability of funding and job performance. Primary responsibilities will include, but are not limited to, generation of stable mutant lines via CRISPR/cas9 system; fish husbandry and maintenance of zebrafish and cichlid stocks; basic molecular biology, include PCR, cloning, in situ hybridization analysis of gene expression; light and electron microscopic analysis of different mutant phenotypes; landmark-based morphometric analysis of craniofacial bone shape in experimental animals; use different transgenic zebrafish lines to conditionally regulate gene expression. Training of lab personnel in various husbandry and molecular biological techniques.

The successful candidate is required to have a B.S. in biology or related field. Highly desirable qualifications include 1-2 years experience with fish husbandry and/or fish developmental genetics. Inquiries about the position can be directed to Craig Albertson, albertson@bio.umass.edu.

Salary commensurate with experience.

Candidates must apply online by submitting a cover letter, CV, and the contact details of three references willing to provide letters of recommendation to:

http://umass.interviewexchange.com/jobofferdetails.jsp?JOBID=75171

Review of applications will begin August 26, 2016 and continue until the position is filled. Applications received by August 26th will be given priority consideration.
The University of Massachusetts Amherst is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Employer of women, minorities, protected veterans, and individuals with disabilities and encourages applications from these and other protected group members. 

Dr. POWDER JOINING CLEMSON UNIVERSITY



Dr. Kara E. Powder, a postdoc in the lab of Dr. Craig Albertson, will be joining the Clemson University Department of Biological Sciences in Fall 2016 as an Assistant Professor.  There she will continue her work on the genomic and developmental basis of craniofacial evolution in cichlid fishes.  Congratulations, Kara!




CONGRATULATIONS TO KATELYN MULLEN ‘16


Katelyn Mullen, a senior Biology major, is the recipient of a Biology Undergraduate Travel Award. She will be presenting her research in a poster titled “New single-copy nuclear loci for scale insect’s systematics” at the International Symposium of Scale Insect Studies in Catania, Sicily this June. Katelyn works in the laboratory of Professor Ben Normark; he and Scott Schneider are coauthors on the abstract. She looks forward to presenting her research in this professional meeting and discussing her work with experts in her field. Congratulations, Katelyn!




BIOLOGY PROFESSOR BEN NORMARK SELECTED AS A FULBRIGHT SCHOLAR

Benjamin Normark, biology, was recently selected as a Fulbright scholar and will spend the fall 2016 semester in Mexico documenting the spread of the insect, cycad aulacaspis scale. It is an invasive species that threatens the country’s cycads, plants sometimes called “living fossils” because they have changed little in the last 280 million years.

Globally, says Normark, “Cycads are under unprecedented assault from armored scale insects and from the global nursery trade that sees cycads as commercially valuable ornamentals.” The plants superficially resemble palms, and are sometimes called ‘sago palms,’ but they constitute their own ancient branch of the plant family tree.

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