Current News

Biology professors Elsbeth Walker and Madelaine Bartlett provided expert commentary for a news story about gene editing in human embryos.

The Skouta group (http://people.chem.umass.edu/skouta/) is seeking a highly motivated synthetic medicinal chemistry post-doc to join the new laboratory. The Skouta Group research covers medicinal chemistry, protein chemistry, computer modeling, biological assays and in vitro studies. The major therapeutic focuses are cancer, neurodegeneration and infection diseases. The successful candidate will be involved in the design and synthesis of small molecule drug candidates with well-defined mode of action for the development of better therapeutic treatments.

For more information please visit: https://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/about/announcements/postdoctoral-resea...

The Department of Biology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor. The successful candidate will also be a part of the Institute for Applied Life Sciences (IALS), which has a primary goal of developing translational research programs, fostering interactions with industry, and training of the life sciences workforce.

For more information please visit: https://www.bio.umass.edu/biology/about/announcements/assistant-professo...

The 4-year grant will allow Biology professor emeritus Eric Bittman to determine the sequence of duper, a mutation that speeds up the circadian clock and dramatically reduces jet lag by affecting the function of a master pacemaker in the hypothalamus. See the full article here: http://gpls.cns.umass.edu/nsb

The Department of Biology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst invites applications for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant or Associate Professor. The successful candidate will also be a part of the Institute for Applied Life Sciences (see IALS), which has the goals of developing translational research programs, fostering interactions with industry, and training a translational life sciences workforce. New faculty members will be able to take full advantage of the substantial investments in campus infrastructure and core facilities made by IALS (see IALS Cores for details).

The Department of Biology at the University of Massachusetts, Amherst invites applications from quantitative cell biologists for a tenure-track position at the rank of Assistant Professor. We are broadly seeking cell biologists who are addressing fundamental questions using quantitative microscopy, molecular, biochemical, and/or genetic approaches. This search is part of a strategic investment in quantitative life sciences, and we especially encourage applicants whose research uses quantitative methods including, but not limited to, mathematical modeling of cell and/or sub-cellular behaviors, automated image analysis, and/or single molecule imaging. The cell biologist will be able to take full advantage of substantial new investments in campus infrastructure, including the light microscopy core facility, which was recently designated a Nikon Center of Excellence, and will join a department with existing strength in the cytoskeleton cell biology field. The successful candidate will be expected to have a strong commitment to undergraduate and graduate education. For more information visit: www.bio.umass.edu/biology/about/announcements

If you are fond of fruits, vegetables, and nuts, you will appreciate the research Bryanna Joyce ’20 conducted with honeybees as a summer scholar at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Joyce, a plant and soil sciences major, spent five weeks feeding bees in 55 different hives at a commercial apiary in Barre, Massachusetts, in an experiment to learn if natural pollens can improve the health of honeybees. Each week she hand made dozens of pollen patties—out of sunflower pollen, wildflower pollen, a mixture of both, or a pollen substitute beekeepers often employ. She then measured the prevalence of several parasites and diseases harmful to the bees.

See the full article: the website

The William Lee Science Impact Program (Lee-SIP) is a Research Experience for undergraduates (REU) program designed to expand and broaden participation in undergraduate research. The program provides students the opportunity to work on fun, novel, and interesting scientific questions by matching them with faculty members with similar research interests. This years recipients are:

Marzia Maliha - Michele Markstein lab
Kara Conlan - Elena Vazey lab
Jesus Maiiol Diaz - Elizabeth Jakob lab
Javier-Ignacio Escobedo - Elsbeth Walker lab
Sebastian Gomez - Paul Katz lab
Karen Luong - Jeffrey Blanchard lab
Shelby Phillips - Jesse Mager lab

Have a productive summer!