6-10

Using cutting edge microscopy to study high-speed cell migration

Cells within your own body crawl over surfaces and through three-dimensional environments. Some cells crawl slowly, while others crawl very quickly. Conventional microscopy is good for imaging slow-moving cells on flat surfaces but cannot keep up with white blood cells like neutrophils that migrate a thousand times faster through 3D environments. To understand how high-speed cells interact with and crawl through complex environments, we use cutting edge lattice light sheet microscopy that has the necessary speed and resolution to image fast-moving cells and complex environments.

Using zebrafish to understand the developmental origins of disease

The Timme-Laragy lab uses the zebrafish and cell culture to understand how embryonic exposure to pollutants affects embryonic development and later-life health outcomes. We have ongoing projects examining the effects of phthalates, perfluorinated compounds, and PCBs on pancreas and liver development, and are investigating toxicant effects on later-life metabolic diseases. We anchor these morphometric and metabolic outcomes with experiments probing the antioxidant defense system and the Nrf2 signaling pathway.

Characterizing cell wall mutants in the model grass B. distachyon

Grasses represent some of the most agriculturally and economically important plant species around the world. Cereals are a cornerstone of food security, and several high biomass grasses are candidate biofuel crops. Understanding the genetic factors that regulate growth dynamics in grasses is key to bettering our ability to improve and implement these important crops species. In the Hazen lab, we study the transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

Lab Librarian

Our laboratory uses DNA sequences and morphological characters to investigate the diversity, evolution and ecology of armored scale insects (class Insecta: order Hemiptera: family Diaspididae), especially in tropical rainforests. We discover many undescribed species from around the world. The lab librarian is responsible for managing the lab's diverse array of interconnected information resources.

Control of Programmed Cell Death During Development and Pathogenesis

Our lab discovered a new gene that encodes a novel survival protein, Acheron/LARP6, that protects terminally differentiated cells like muscles and neurons from cell death. It is also misregulated in certain cancers and functions to both protect cells from toxic insults like chemotherapy and enhance metastasis. We have found an isoform of this gene that encodes only a small portion of the protein that we believe will antagonize the action of the normal protein.

Avian Vocal Behavior: Pine Warblers

Birds of many species in the wood-warbler family use their songs in especially interesting ways. For example, their songs fall into two categories, and the two kinds of songs are used in different contexts, vary over time and space in different ways, and have different functions in communication. However, although many species in the family share this two-tiered singing system, species differ in the sizes of their song repertoires, how the difference between the two categories is encoded, how song form varies within a population, how songs change over time, and so on.

Bird Nestling Videography Lab Technician - House Wren Project

I’m Aaron Grade (agradeeco.wordpress.com), a PhD student in Dr. Paige Warren’s lab. We are an urban ecology lab based in the Department of Environmental Conservation. I am seeking laboratory technicians in Fall 2017 for an avian urban ecology study. There is the potential to continue working for the project into the Spring semester as well. My study is focused on the effects of perceived predation risk on House Wren nesting biology on an urban-to-rural gradient. During our summer field seasons, we monitor House Wren nests in nest boxes on private homeowner lands.

Mammal Camera Lab Technician - House Wren Project

I’m Aaron Grade (agradeeco.wordpress.com), a PhD student in Dr. Paige Warren’s lab. We are an urban ecology lab based in the Department of Environmental Conservation. I am seeking laboratory technicians in Fall 2017 for an avian urban ecology study. There is the potential to continue working for the project into the Spring semester as well. My study is focused on the effects of perceived predation risk on House Wren nesting biology on an urban-to-rural gradient. During our summer field seasons, we monitor House Wren nests in nest boxes on private homeowner lands.

Adventures in root growth

I am looking for a motivated undergraduate to help us with our experiments on the growth of plant roots. For the moment, tasks will be physiologically based, measuring elongation rate, root diameter, and some other parameters. Some methods will use basic light microscopy. Molecular experiments are likely, in the future. Some work managing plant growth and seed harvet to maintain our lines will also be involved. As the student gains experience in the lab, they will get to take on their own project. Previous lab work is not necessary.

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