Projects

PROJECTS WILL BE LISTED TUESDAY AUGUST 27. YOU CAN SUBMIT APPLICATIONS BETWEEN AUGUST 27 AND SEPTEMBER 8. INTERVIEWS WILL START THE FIRST WEEK OF SCHOOL, SO WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO APPLY EARLY!

**NOTE: FOR HELP WITH YOUR APPLICATION YOU CAN VISIT THE CNS CAREER CENTER @ MORRILL II, ROOM 321**

Remember: You can apply to a maximum of 3 projects, so choose carefully!

You can choose to scroll through all of the projects, or filter them based on whether they are paid or unpaid, whether they offer enough hours for you, etc. For example if you want to see projects that require somewhere between 8-12 hours a week, click on both the 6-10 and 11-15 options under "Hours?" and press the filter button. If you're using a Mac you can select both options by holding the shift while clicking on the options; if you're using a PC, you hopefully know how to do this.

Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Fungal Virulence Testing

Hemlock woolly adelgid (Adelges tsugae; HWA) is one of the most important forest pests in the eastern United States, where it is responsible for the widespread mortality of eastern and Carolina hemlock trees. Since its introduction in the 1950’s HWA has expanded rapidly and can be found in >90% of the regions where hemlock trees are located, including western Massachusetts, and continues to expand northward on a yearly basis.

Native/nonnative species predictions

Insects represent the most species rich group of multicellular organisms, with an unknown number of species remaining to be described. Unfortunately, while species-rich, insects have been identified as one of the groups most likely to be affected by human-mediated climate change, and recent reports have highlighted the pending insect apocalypse. Documenting the study of declines in insect species, however, is limited by the fact that there are too few trained taxonomists who can visually identify an insect specimen to species or can describe new species.

The genetics and development of specialized floral tissue in grasses

The goal of this project is to determine the genes involved in the development of a specialized floral tissue type in grasses - the awn. The awn, a projection from the tissue that protects the developing seed, has diversified widely throughout grasses. Awns are specialized for a number of ecological roles, including photosynthesis to provide the seed with nutrients, as well as seed dispersal and establishment. Although the ecology of awns has been examined, the genetics and development of awns have not been well-studied.