11-15

Immunoengineering the tumor microenvironment with electric pulses

The Srimathveeravalli Research Group studies the effect of non-ionizing energy on tissue biology and uses cell type specific differences to enable tumor ablation, drug delivery and other applications. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are essential for the success of cancer immunotherapy. However, there is high variability in the presence of TILs based on cancer type, immunogenicity of the specific tumor and other factors.

Molecular Mechanisms of Fungicide Resistance in Sclerotinia homeocarpa

The turf pathology lab is looking for a motivated undergraduate student with an interest in mycology and plant pathology to be involved in projects related to microbiology, genetics, and bioinformatics of the turfgrass fungal pathogen Sclerotinia homoeocarpa. In this lab, students will gain experience in lab techniques including (but not limited to) DNA extraction, PCR, gel electrophoresis and culturing and propagation of fungi. Prior relevant lab experience is preferred, though coursework in biotechnology and/ or microbiology will be sufficient.

Vertical launches by butterflies: When do they do it?

A few years ago, Tom DeNatale, a student in Tropical Field Biology, discovered a surprising new trick that butterflies use when they launch themselves into flight: they do a little flip into the air such that they end up being upside down at the end of their first downstroke. So what? For every downstroke there needs to be an upstroke, but since the butterfly is upside down, the "upstroke" becomes another downstroke, propelling the butterfly vertically.

Vertical launches by butterflies: How do they do it?

A few years ago, Tom DeNatale, a student in Tropical Field Biology, discovered a surprising new trick that butterflies use when they launch themselves into flight: they do a little flip into the air such that they end up being upside down at the end of their first downstroke. So what? For every downstroke there needs to be an upstroke, but since the butterfly is upside down, the "upstroke" becomes another downstroke, propelling the butterfly vertically.

How do cells divide asymmetrically?

When a cell divides to create two cells that are different from each other, how does this occur? How does the organism “know” that cell A goes on the right and cell B goes on the left, or how does the cell ensure that the division and all the cellular contents get segregated correctly? The Facette lab is interested in how cells divide asymmetrically, and we study this process in plant cells.

The Forest Microbiome Project: Host-Virus Associations

Microbiome research is among the most exciting and promising areas of science today due to many technological advances that allow us to determine in complex environments which microbes are present and their metabolism. Our laboratory’s primary long-term research goal is to contribute to the understanding of microbial communities and their evolution by developing and applying genome-based technology. A distinguishing feature of our research is the use of long-term experimental manipulation approaches on scales from individual microbes to ecological communities.

Uncover the molecular secrets in host-microbe mutualism with genetic tools

The Wang Lab, located in the Life Science Laboratories, is interested in the mechanisms of beneficial host-microbe interactions. Our experimental system is the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, with important economic and environmental relevance, as well as similarities to pathogenic systems. We seek BURA students to dissect the genetic basis of the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, using forward genetics (map-based cloning) and reverse genetics (CRISPR/Cas9) approaches.

Neural Stem Cell proliferation and Brain Growth (Soph/Jr, Honors)

The Karlstrom Lab investigates the formation and growth of the forebrain, hypothalamus and pituitary gland in the zebrafish. We are examining how cell-cell signaling controls stem cell proliferation to regulate tissue growth and cell renewal in larvae and adults. This position is for students ready to pursue a serious honors thesis project, including summer research. The student will begin by quantifying normal brain growth during larval development using a series of fluorescent transgenic zebrafish lines.

Understanding and optimizing plant development for agricultural gains

The Bartlett Lab is seeking undergraduate researchers interested in plant biology and genetics to work on the evolution of development in the grasses. While some genes enhance growth in the plant, other genes work to repress growth. In the grasses, these genes have a role in flower and seed development, and thus could be important for agriculture. To better understand the role of these genes, we will be using molecular biology techniques to test the function of these genes in different tissues and different species.

Characterization of rice plasma membrane intrinsic protein members, OsPIP1;

In this project, our lab is characterizing the members of Plasma Membrane Intrinsic Proteins (PIP) subfamily of aquaporins for metalloids (arsenic and boron) transport in rice. It is well known that rice accumulate very high amount of arsenic in the edible grains and arsenic being very toxic and carcinogenic, there is a significant health risk associated with rice-based diet. We are interested in developing arsenic free or low levels of arsenic accumulating rice cultivars via manipulating genes associated with arsenic accumulation using both forward and reverse genetic approaches.

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