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NEW OPPORTUNITY FOR PAID FISH LAB POSITION!

If you already applied to 3 BURA positions, you can still apply for this position by writing to us directly at email: albertsonfish@gmail.com.

RE: Work Study Job in Albertson Laboratory, Biology Department

Job Title: Lab Assistant. Hours per week: 5-10, email ASAP, scheduling interviews starting 1/22

Pay rate: $11.00/hr.

This is an on campus UMASS Work Study position for Spring and/or Summer 2018.

Is Japanese knotweed out-competing forest trees on river bars?

Japanese knotweed is a major invasive plant in the United States that has occupied many of the roadside edges and riverside plant communities throughout the Northeast. We are seeking a student to work on Japanese knotweed ecology and its competition on river gravel bars with seedlings of native forest trees. Failure of tree seedlings to thrive in such sites due to knotweed dominance of bars may affect forest colonization of new land created as rivers change position.

Conservation ecology of the endangered Puritan Tiger Beetle 1: field study

Conservation for all threatened and endangered North American tiger beetle species depends on an understanding of their population dynamics. Ecological life tables are a central tool for the study of population dnyamics; and the similarity of tiger beetle life-histories would make a life-table developed for one species applicable to all species - yet this has never been developed.

A student-run organic vineyard on campus: getting involved in set up

There is a growing awareness of the possibilities of viticulture in cool climates thanks to newly bred varieties adapted to the New England local conditions. These new varieties are much more resilient to the sudden climate variations that we are now experimenting due to global climate changes. Because of this new opportunity, an increasing number of small, family-run vineyards has been opening in New England. New courses of viticulture that we have developed emphasize in particular the challenges and opportunities of the growing local cold climate industry and small-scale vineyards.

Emerging grape varieties for a changing climate: cold hardiness

Facing unpredictable climate changes, maintaining a sustainable agriculture depends on the availability of genetically diverse cultivars. The traditional European grapes (e.g. Pinot Noir) are cultivars of a single species. In contrast, emerging grape cultivars (European-American hybrids) take advantage of the tremendous genetic diversity of the native American grape species (about 30 species). The traditional European grape varieties have little cold hardiness.

Insect Taxonomy and Curation

Students will help organize the UMass insect collection by sorting unsorted specimens to order (Coleoptera, Hemiptera, etc.) and within orders, sorting specimens into the most common families. Students will learn about insect classification and diversity through hands-on experience with specimens. Prior knowlege of insect taxonomy is helpful but not essential.

Pioneer Valley Forest Community Project - Invertebrate ID

Forest communities across the globe are being impacted by rapidly expanding human presence due to agriculture and urbanization. The Pioneer Valley Forest Community Project is assessing the response of forest ecosystems to these pressures in Western Massachusetts. To evaluate this response, we collected data on multiple taxa including birds, tree communities, and invertebrates.

Effect of a virus on adult house fly food intake

House fly is a major problem world wide. It vectors pathogens of humans, food products, and domestic animals. A newly discovered virus attacks the salivary glands of adult flies of both sexes. The pathology of the virus is that it prevents females from producing eggs and prevents mating in both sexes. Internally it causes hypertrophy or enlargement of the salivary glands. In order to produce the numerous virions essential for transmission, a considerable amount of energy in the form of food intake must be essential.

Molecular genetic mechanisms of host-microbe mutualism

The Wang Lab, located in the Life Science Laboratories, is interested in the mechanisms of beneficial host-microbe interactions. Our experimental system is the symbiosis between legumes and nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, with important economic and environmental relevance, as well as similarities to pathogenic interactions. The BURA student will be engaged in dissecting the genetic basis of the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis, in particular characterizing the defects in host mutants unable to sustain a successful symbiotic relationship.

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