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Internship with the Kasanka Baboon Project

We are looking for an undergraduate intern willing to earn credit for working 3- hours per week wit the Kasanka Baboon Project.

Duties include organizing data collected on wild baboons, helping to promote the project via social media, and participating in creating a fundraising campaign for 2019. fundraising. There is potential for the student to learn how to collect behavioral data on baboons and contribute to scientific publications.

Climate Change and Fish Physiology

Temperature and other factors pose lethal and sublethal limits on animals, determining where they can thrive. My research focuses on how temperature and food availability affect fish physiology (e.g. growth, energetics, swimming ability) to understand how climate change affects fish populations and their geographic distributions. I specifically work with alewife and blueback herring, two Species of Concern that are an important food source for aquatic, marine, and terrestrial animals along the Eastern coast of the United States.

Cell division lab

Scientists have been studying mitosis for more than one hundred years, but there are still many unanswered questions! Our lab is interested in how the mitotic spindle forms and moves chromosomes in anaphase. We use diverse cells in our work. We utilize microscopy to image the mitotic spindle in control cells and following various perturbations. We spend lots of time watching cells divide. I am looking for students who like science, and who are curious about how cells work. Computer skills are a plus.

Climate Resilient Wine Grape Cultivars: Thinning and Juice Quality

Facing unpredictable climate changes, maintaining a resilient agriculture depends on the availability of genetically diverse cultivars. The traditional European grapes (e.g. Pinot Noir) are cultivars of a single species. In contrast, emerging grape cultivars (European-American hybrids) take advantage of the tremendous genetic diversity of the native American grape species (about 30 species). In the traditional European grape varieties, shoot and fruit thinning is known to influence fruit juice quality (ripening time, sugar, acidity) and help reduce pesticide usage.

Umass student-run organic vineyard on campus

There is a growing awareness of the possibilities of viticulture in cool climates thanks to newly bred varieties adapted to the New England local conditions. These new varieties are much more resilient to the sudden climate variations that we are now experimenting due to global climate changes. Because of this new opportunity, an increasing number of small, family-run vineyards has been opening in New England. New courses of viticulture that we have developed emphasize in particular the challenges and opportunities of the growing local cold climate industry and small-scale vineyards.

Emerging grape varieties for a changing climate: cold hardiness

Facing unpredictable climate changes, maintaining a sustainable agriculture depends on the availability of genetically diverse cultivars. The traditional European grapes (e.g. Pinot Noir) are cultivars of a single species. In contrast, emerging grape cultivars (European-American hybrids) take advantage of the tremendous genetic diversity of the native American grape species (about 30 species). The traditional European grape varieties have little cold hardiness.

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